Volume 3, No. 2, December 2007

Research Note

 

 

Corporate Governance and Earnings Management: The Implications of Corporate Governance Best-Practice Principles for Taiwanese Listed Companies
Ken Y. Chen, Randal J. Elder and Yung-Ming Hsieh

Abstract

This study investigates whether corporate governance characteristics, mandated by the Corporate Governance Best-Practice Principles (CGBPP) for companies listed in Taiwan , are associated with earnings management. In particular, we examine whether the independence, financial expertise, and voluntary formation of independent directorships (supervisorships) are associated with the absolute value of discretionary accruals. Our findings suggest that the independence of supervisors, the financial expertise of independent directors, and the voluntary formation of independent directorships (supervisorships) are associated with a lower likelihood of earnings management. These findings are stronger after the CGBPP was enacted, suggesting that the implementation of CGBPP has lowered the likelihood of earnings management.

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The Impact of the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance: Compliance, Institutional Investors and Stock Performance
Effiezal A. Abdul Wahab, Janice C.Y. How and Peter Verhoeven

Abstract

In 2001, the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance (MCCG) became an integral part of the Bursa Malaysia Listing Rules, which requires all listed firms to disclose the extent of compliance with the MCCG. Our panel analysis of 440 firms from 1999 to 2002 finds that corporate governance reform in Malaysia has been successful, with a significant improvement in governance practices. The relationship between ownership by the Employees Provident Fund (EPF) and corporate governance has strengthened during the period subsequent to the reform, in line with the lead role taken by the EPF in establishing the Minority Shareholders Watchdog Group. The implementation of MCCG has had a substantial effect on shareholders' wealth, increasing stock prices by an average of about 4.8%. Although there is no evidence that politically connected firms perform better, political connections do have a significantly negative effect on corporate governance, which is mitigated by institutional ownership.

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Research Note
An Investigation of Factors Influencing the Association between Top Management Ownership and Earnings Management
Marion Hutchinson and Sidney Leung

Abstract

This study conjectures and shows that the level of stock ownership by top management is non-monotonically associated with managers' propensity to manage earnings. Increasing ownership from low levels decreases earnings management while ownership at high levels increases earnings management. Further, this study attempts to discern when the effects of management ownership are more salient for the firm. The results of this exploratory analysis of 15,945 firm observations over a six-year period show that the non-monotonic association between top management ownership and earnings management is significant, and hence more important, for the firm characteristics of low growth opportunities, high operating volatility, small size, frequent losses, high-technology, and low institutional ownership.

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