Volume 4, No. 1, June 2008

 

 

The Role of Auditing in Buyer-Supplier Relations
Hui Chen and Debra Jeter

Abstract

Supply chain management has emerged as one of the more important topics in managerial accounting. The importance of information exchange between parties involved in supply chains has also been well documented. By addressing the value of audits in this setting, this theoretical paper serves to link two strains of accounting research: the managerial topic of supply chain effectiveness and the value of the audit function, in particular audits of the suppliers conducted by the buyers. We analyze the role of supplier audits with long-term, profit sharing contracts between the buyers and suppliers. Through a stylized model, we demonstrate that when random supplier audits are conducted, the buyer can effectively leave zero informational rents to the supplier, regardless of the supplier's cost type.

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Corporate Governance and Audit Fees: Evidence of Countervailing Relations
Paul A. Griffin, David H. Lont and Yuan Su

Abstract

This study documents that audit fees, and hence audit quality, and governance reflect two countervailing relations, namely, a fee increase because of exogenous changes in expected liability that require greater auditing and other mechanisms to attain better governance, and a fee reduction because auditors reduce the price of risk to reflect the benefits of better governance. The study period provides an interesting setting to test these relations because it covers the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation, which imposed a substantial cost on many companies to strengthen governance, including increased auditing and internal control spending. Yet, after controlling for such increased spending, our results also suggest that better governance reduces the cost of auditing.

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What Triggers Top Management Turnovers in China ?
Peter Cheng, Jack L. Li and Wilson H.S. Tong

Abstract

Studies on management turnover in Chinese companies typically find that turnover decisions are associated with companies' accounting performance. Using a sample of Chinese company turnovers during 2000-2003, we disaggregate their net-earnings into core, recurring non-core, and other non-recurring components. Analyzing these earnings components, we show that turnover decisions for government firms are related negatively only to recurring earnings which consist of operating, administrative and financial expenses. Leverage also plays a significant role suggesting the concern that high debt levels may reduce the impacts of the Chinese SOE reforms. However, turnovers in private firms are associated with poor core earnings, a result similar with profitmaximizing firms in developed economies.

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