Volume 4, No. 2, December 2008

 

 

The Effects of International Financial Reporting Standards on the Accounts and Accounting Quality of Australian Firms: A Retrospective Study
John Goodwin, Kamran Ahmed and Richard Heaney

Abstract

We examine the effect of Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) on the accounts and accounting quality of 1,065 listed firms, relying on retrospective reconciliations between Australian Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (AGAAP) and IFRS. We find that IFRS increases total liabilities, decreases equity and more firms have earnings decreases than increases. IFRS earnings and equity are not more value relevant than AGAAP earnings and equity and while adjustments for changes in accounting for provisions and intangibles other than goodwill are value relevant, they weaken associations with market value. Goodwill adjustments improve associations with market value. We also find that the reconciliation note for the earnings adjustments contained no new information.

top

Incremental Voluntary Disclosure on Corporate Websites, Determinants and Consequences
Samir Trabelsi, Real Labelle and Pascal Dumontier

Abstract

This study analyses the determinants and consequences of internet financial reporting (IFR). Our evidence indicates that firms use the internet to report complementary information on firm background, management forecasts, intangible assets and on social and environmental issues. Our results indicate that the decision to provide additional voluntary financial disclosures through corporate websites is mostly influenced by share turnover, the future profitability of the firm and the level of competition in the industry. Last, we find that the extent of voluntary disclosure on corporate websites is related positively to forecast accuracy, and negatively to the dispersion of analysts forecasts, suggesting that such disclosures provide useful information to analysts.

top

Corporate Governance and Firm Performance in Iran
Bita Mashayekhi and Mohammad S. Bazaz

Abstract

This study uses data from companies listed in the Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE) for the years 2005-2006 to investigate the role of corporate governance indices on firm performance. We use board size, board independence, board leadership and institutional investors on the board as corporate governance indices and EPS, ROA and ROE as firm performance surrogates. Our regression results show that board size is negatively associated with firm performance. Moreover, the presence of outside directors strengthens the firms' performance. We find, however, no relationship between leadership structure and firm performance. Likewise, the presence of institutional investors on the board of directors is not positively associated with firm performance.

top